Test Your EYE-Q

How much do you know about eye health? Take our eye health quiz to find out (and scroll down for the answers)!

 

The Questions

1. True or False: The sun emits three types of ultraviolet rays: UVA, UVB and UVC

2. UV exposure can lead to or exacerbate the following eye conditions:

a) Cataracts
b) Macular degeneration
c) Pterygium, a tissue growth over the white of the eye
d) All of the above

3. True or False: UVA and UVB rays are stronger in the spring and summer than they are during the winter.

4. True or False: Larger sunglasses lenses block more light and UV radiation than smaller lenses.

5. True or False: Polarized sunglasses offer more UV protection than non-polarized sunglasses.

6. True or False: The sun is the only source of UV radiation.

7. True or False: If it's cloudy, you're not at risk of UV damage.

8. True or False: Darker lenses provide more sun protection.

9. True or False: Your eyes can get sunburned.

10. True or False: Light-colored eyes (like blue and green) are more susceptible to UV damage.

 


The Answers


1. The sun emits three types of ultraviolet rays: UVA, UVB and UVC: TRUE
You may never have heard of UVC rays, because they don't actually reach the earth's surface -- but they do exist! Check out our recent blog on UV protection to learn more.

2. UV exposure can lead to or exacerbate the following eye conditions:
a) Cataracts
b) Macular degeneration
c) Pterygium, a tissue growth over the white of the eye
d) All of the above

According to the National Eye Institute, UV exposure can lead to cataracts, macular degeneration (the leading cause of blindness in the U.S.) and eye growths such as pterygium. Other less common but serious health conditions linked to UV exposure include ocular melanoma and skin cancer in the eye area.

3. UVA and UVB rays are stronger in the spring and summer than they are during the winter: FALSE
This is a tricky one--because it depends on the type of UV ray! Although UVB rays, which are shorter, are stronger in the U.S. during the spring and summer months, UVA rays, which are longer, are the same year-round. You do, however, get more UVA exposure at higher altitudes.

4. Larger sunglasses lenses block more light and UV radiation than smaller lenses: TRUE
The larger the surface area of your sunglass lens, the more UV protection you're getting in and around your eyes. Bonus: Large glasses also help shield your eyes from allergens.

5. Polarized sunglasses offer more UV protection than non-polarized sunglasses: FALSE
Another tricky one! As this CNN article explains, polarized sunglasses do add more protection against the glare that comes from sunlight reflecting off surfaces like snow or water. But polarization itself does not increase UV protection. For more on the difference between polarized and non-polarized lenses, check out our recent blog post. And when it comes to protecting your eyes, make sure your lenses offer UV protection!

6. The sun is the only source of UV radiation: FALSE
The most common source of UV radiation is the sun, but as the American Optometric Association points out, there are also artificial sources, including tanning beds, lasers and welding machines.

7. If it's cloudy, you're not at risk of UV damage: FALSE
UV radiation can easily pass through haze and clouds, so it's important to protect your eyes no matter the weather or season, says the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

8. Darker lenses provide more sun protection: FALSE
According to Consumer Reports, lens color isn't a factor in UV protection -- it's all about making sure that the brand explicitly spells out how much UV protection their lenses offer. Fortunately, all Eagle Eyes sunglasses block 99.9% of harmful UV radiation, so you're covered no matter which style you choose.

However, for vision enhancement beyond UV protection -- like improving clarity and definition at night or in low light conditions -- the color of the lens does matter. Read our recent blog post to find out how.

9. Your eyes can get sunburned: TRUE
Technically it's called photokeratitis, but according to the American Optometric Association, prolonged UV exposure over a short period of time can lead to uncomfortable sunburn-like symptoms, including red eyes, the sensation of something stuck in your eye, excessive tearing and light sensitivity. The good new is that these symptoms are temporary and do not typically cause permanent damage.

10. Light-colored eyes (like blue and green) are more susceptible to UV damage: TRUE
The lighter your eyes, the more photosensitive -- or vulnerable to UV damage -- you are.

As the American Academy of Ophthalmology reports, certain medications and conditions like cataracts can also make you more photosensitive -- so be sure to get the protection you need!


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